Punk Rock

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As much as I’d love this Yamanote Line “Let’s Speak English” segment to be a subtle criticism on the state of Japanese punk rock (パンク), panku is indeed how you say “flat tire” in Japanese. I learned this after watching Trevor from Music Related machine-translate some emails from Micro Mach Machine with every other sentence saying something like “electro flat tire pop.”

Marxy wrote a lot of essays back on his old site Néomarxisme. This is one of them.

12 Responses

  1. Chris_B Says:

    that dog always looks sooooo stoned

  2. marxy Says:

    He’s high on the fact that he can speak a useless set of arcane English expressions only understandable from backwards translation.

  3. r. Says:

    yeah, but at least he’s high on life, not on drugs…

  4. r. Says:

    you know, know that chris mentions it, there IS something really, really doped-up about this little poochy’s orbs. sort of like you took the ‘buzz factor’ from Shaggy and implanted it in a dog. i dunno about you, but this makes me wanna learn more japanese!

  5. Grishnackh Says:

    I too am perplexed by that dog’s expressions whenever I see him on the train, even though I’m not a native English-speaker.

    Talking about wacky English, have any of you guys read the Moetan series? It also contains many awkwardly constructed sentences, not helped by the fact that they’re basically a pile of otaku references and in-jokes. I did enjoy the first one, but the references start to get too obscure in the sequels so I just lost interest.

    And I too am annoyed by the bulks of mediocre punk rock that take up a corner in every Tower and HMV. Especially the hardcore variety, which is basically just metal made easy. Don’t get me wrong, I LOVE old punk rock…

  6. nickink Says:

    Interesting – it’s the same, or nearly, in Korea – ‘punka’, from ‘puncture’.

  7. Chris_B Says:

    I think using “punk” like that is English English, but I dont know for sure, I only speak American.

  8. jasong Says:

    Arcane is the word. My guess is that an exec at JR dusted off his old English text from 1962 and had the content people use that as their source material.

    Marxy, did you get my email a couple weeks back about that visual kei contact?

  9. marxy Says:

    Yes, I got your mail. Sorry I didn’t get back to you. I planned on catching up on all that this week, but I’m now busy with all sorts of other things. Thanks again for the contact info.

  10. marxy Says:

    Arcane is the word. My guess is that an exec at JR dusted off his old English text from 1962 and had the content people use that as their source material.

    I think those ads are written by professors at Keio Univ.

  11. jasong Says:

    I think those ads are written by professors at Keio Univ.

    Really?

    All I could think when I read them was “If you use English like this, people will laugh at you.”

  12. Carl Says:

    I was talking to an English dude the other day, and his bike had a “puncture” instead of “flat”– presumably because there’s no obvious way for a bicycle to collect ¥100,000/month + key money for an apartment.

    Now, the question arises, why don’t the English have apartments or resumés (=C.V.s)? Answer: They’re the only ones who hate the French more than Americans.

    Anyhow, my favorite J-punk linguistic moment was the episode of Tensai Kyoshi Yanagisawa in which the eavesdropping brother-in-law and niece mishear “panku” as “pantsu” causing hilarity to ensue.