We Are the Gyromite Condemnation Affiliate

archive6

In my real life, I may write friends email forwards that read, “G-Rons, look what someone just sent me a ‘link’ to! If you have a subscription to the Inter Net, you should totally check out this live performance of the video game Punch Out.” But no matter how funny I found that online clip, I certainly shouldn’t be wasting valuable blog space on it. (Next week: the AWESOMENESS of Chronic-Narnia-Cles.)

Recently the meta-blogs have been abuzz with various amateur home videos of what appear to be high school talent showcases featuring teenagers re-enacting or musically recreating various mid-1980s Nintendo software titles. When it’s not Little Mac beating up the one-waza Don Flamenco (Pt. I), it’s the Mario theme on glockenspiel. Famicon nostalgia is at its peak, and I sometimes find myself voluntary listening to bossa nova indie pop records made completely with four-channel 8-bit sound.

Now if the kids in these videos are really high school students, and these clips are recent, that means — are you ready for this? — they are recreating games made before they were even born. Put this in context: The first time these kids probably picked up a NES, it was 1996 and Crash Bandicoot was on the cover of Time. Power Gloves were so marked down in price that you could buy four — and leave two in your locker at school.

But hey, who wasn’t making non-video game tributes to massively outdated video games in their teen years? Just to illustrate once and for all that “the more things change, the more they stay the same,” I’ve dug into my childhood collection of artwork and now present “non-video game tributes to early video games.”

EARLY ITALIAN FUTURIST THEATRE PIECE ABOUT BASEBALL
by W. David Marx, age 16

A: 11111111111111111111111111111111
B: 00000000000000000000000000000000
A: (becomes a bullet)
B: Can I be “A” next time? You are always “A.”
(curtain falls)
Audience: We throw fruit at you — and just as legend has it, Boccioni shall cover himself with his painting and then die years later in a wartime equestrian accident.

HAIKU ABOUT POPEYE

We go all the way
to FAO Schwartz and now
this is what we buy?

NO LIMIT TEXAS HOLD ‘EM POKER VERSION OF PONG

pong.jpg

DUTCH WIKIPEDIA SITE LOOSELY BASED ON BURGERTIME

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamburger

A COMMERCIAL TRANSACTION INVOLVING OLD ISSUES OF NINTENDO POWER

Don’t take my word for it. See for yourself!

MY TELEPHONE NUMBER

007-373-5963

W. David MARX (Marxy)
January 13, 2006

Marxy wrote a lot of essays back on his old site Néomarxisme. This is one of them.

26 Responses

  1. EJK Says:

    √+

  2. alin Says:

    look what happens if you don’t write ethnocentric stuff about japan. it’s 1 am and you only got one comment or whatever that is.

  3. Momus Says:

    Ladies and gentlemen, the Super Madrigal Brothers. Established 2002.

  4. channing Says:

    Have you seen the Zelda fuzzy wristcuffs at Hot Topic? They’re marked down. And they aren’t marketed to me.

  5. marxy Says:

    look what happens if you don’t write ethnocentric stuff about japan. it’s 1 am and you only got one comment or whatever that is.

    I don’t know what you do on Friday nights, but I hope you have greater thrills in your life besides chiding younger people on the Internet.

    Ladies and gentlemen, the Super Madrigal Brothers. Established 2002.

    Momus – always two steps ahead. Always. Even in the joke entries.

    You boys must be proud!

  6. james Says:

    your comment about picking up video games in 1996 is a little off base. im 18 right now, and graduated high school just last year. I, and many of my friends, had NES’s in our homes growing up- discussing nes games in kindergarten and first grade was a major part of the socialization process for us, so i dont have a problem believing that current high school students’ nostalgia is legitimate. the kids in high school now had older siblings growing up, they didnt grow up in bubbles.

  7. marxy Says:

    You’re right, although I still find it strange that games I played when I was 7 or 8 when they were the hottest thing around were still played by kids in the era of Super Nintendo and Sega CD.

    Am I wrong to think there will be no nostalgia for the Super Nintendo?

  8. NSF Says:

    Nick Currie. Est. 1960
    David Marx. Est. 1978

    With a cushy 18 year head start on Marxy, the big question is why isn’t Momus a few MORE steps ahead!?

  9. David Says:

    Agree with James.

    I’m in high school and have been playing super nintendo games my whole life; granted, my siblings are 5 to 11 years older than me, but I remember the Super Nintendo era just fine. Also, I remember getting those ’90s Nintendo Powers in the mail, and they’re probably still in my room somewhere.

    But we already established that your comments are a bit off base, right? :X That’s okay.

    It’s also extremely popular to think Atari/Nintendo/Super Nintendo is cool. I think even JC Penny’s is selling shirts with crap like “Old school!1” with a Nintendo controller these days, and of course, so is Hot Topic.

    I can’t wait to hear about Chronic-Narnia-Cles. Google is giving me nothing.

  10. Momus Says:

    With a cushy 18 year head start on Marxy, the big question is why isn’t Momus a few MORE steps ahead!?

    Cos I’m “young at heart” and he’s “older than his years”?

  11. NSF` Says:

    Youth gone wild?

  12. Michael McCarthy Says:

    You just really can’t get enough River City Ransom these days— it’s totally and completely not overdone in the slightest.

    Also, Chip Music is where it’s at— 8bit rocks.

  13. alin Says:

    Nick Currie. Est. 1960
    David Marx. Est. 1978

    does this simplify the oedipal thing ?

  14. alin Says:

    and, did you have to embaress me in front of everyone

    I don’t know what you do on Friday nights, but I hope you have greater thrills in your life besides chiding younger people on the Internet.

  15. nate Says:

    marxy, I’m sure some 33 year old is bemoaning your pong joke as well.

    LCDsoundsystem had a jibe about young hipsters and their “nostalgia for the unremembered 80’s”. I think that once grunge comes back enough the same kids will be nostalgic for that. Highschoolers just lack the cultural clout to push nostalgia for the products of their own youths, and so cling to the well established late 80’s.
    Their hipster precociousness was every bit as present in people like you and me (est 1979) taking part in the popular revival of the 70’s that spanned the early to mid 90’s.

  16. marxy Says:

    For a while, I wondered how history would treat the late 80s. I guess Nintendo is one of the more obvious high points. I don’t see a big Debbie Gibson revival happening anytime soon, although you shouldn’t quote me on that.

  17. jasong Says:

    Marxy — do you wear BluBlockers when you blog?

  18. Naxuz Says:

    I too have to disagree with Marxy on this one. I’m 18 now and I got my NES when I was four or five years old. Everyone had a NES, and although it was technically the time of SNES and the Genesis (Megadrive around here), everyone was talking about the games they played on their NES, even those fortunate enough to have an 16-bit console. Our generation feels nostalgia towards NES games only, really, I can’t think of anyone my age embracing the other cultural phenomena of the late 80’s.

    Oh, we also played games on Commodore 64’s and Amigas. It was a lot cheaper and easier for parents to buy an old, used computer / game console than blow wads of cash on a spanking new SNES, because if someone had a NES or some other late 80’s system, games could be traded and enjoyed by as much people as possible.

  19. marxy Says:

    This is great. I’m out of touch with the kids, and they all surface to catch me up. Getting old has never been easier.

  20. Michael McCarthy Says:

    Mario Systems …nintendo music set to piano.

    Even general nostalgia for retro-gaming is a mystery to me— spend any ammount of time with an NES emulator and you’ll realise that moving a blocky pixilated blob over awkward jumping puzzles makes you want to smash your pc.

  21. Carl Says:

    Something to remember is that once you got older, your parents sold your NES at a garage sale. Then the younger set would start with a used NES before graduating to an NES. I actually started with a 2600, in spite of its being far behind the curve. (Worth mentioning: NES games are mostly still fun/playable. With only a few exceptions, Atari games are not.) Of course, I’m post-collegiate, so maybe things changed in the 5 years between me and today’s high schoolers.

  22. Carl Says:

    Ahem, “graduating to an SNES.”

  23. alin Says:

    atch me up. Getting old has never been

    wait, see, you’re being oedipalized from both ends.

  24. youngjames Says:

    I don’t see a big Debbie Gibson revival happening anytime soon, although you shouldn’t quote me on that.

    i think certified bananas dropped the Shake-Your-Love drumapella on their Lemon-Red Mix a few months back (october maybe?)

    in two years that 12″ will be probably be worth real money.

    to keep it japenese related, why is no one talking about the tongari kids song b-dash?

  25. marxy Says:

    i think certified bananas dropped the Shake-Your-Love drumapella

    It begins…

  26. nate Says:

    alin:wait, see, you’re being oedipalized from both ends.

    you dirty!