Meeting Modernity 17

Meeting Modernity

The Meeting Modernity series of found photographs is the focus of Néojaponisme’s first traveling exhibition. Recently unearthed outside of the city of Sano in Tochigi-ken, this series of pictures documents Japan as it engaged with modernization and commercial photography in the Meiji and Taishō Periods. The series is comprised of portrait photography in particular.

The exhibition makes it’s sophomore appearance at Reading Frenzy, a small press emporium and gallery in Portland, Oregon (kitty-corner from Powell’s Books) on this very Thursday.

Meeting Modernity is accompanied by a trio of essays by Ian Lynam, W. David Marx, and Matt Treyvaud reflecting the collection of photographs, the history of Japanese photography, commercial art, and Japanese society.

A limited edition of full-color Meeting Modernity postcard sets from the previous exhibition in Los Angeles’ Young Art will be available at Reading Frenzy.

January 8–February 1 2009
Opening Reception:
Thursday January 8, 2009 6–9pm

Reading Frenzy
921 SW Oak St.
Portland, OR 97205

If you are in Portland, we heartily encourage you to visit the exhibition.

January 7, 2009

Ian Lynam is a graphic designer living in Tokyo and the art director of Neojaponisme. His website is located at His new book, Parallel Strokes, on the intersection of graffiti and typography is available now.

2 Responses

  1. Josh Says:

    Just went and saw your exhibit at the Reading Frenzy bookstore. The pictures were surprisingly small, but very entertaining. The one I liked most was a picture of 8 men dressed with pants and longsleeve shirts with rice hats working in (what appears to be) a rock quarry. These photos seem to represent an aspect of “working Japan” that appears often overlooked or passed by in historical accounts of the early Modern period. Thank you for exhibiting them here in Portland it was a real treat.

    ~Joshua Wheeler
    Neojaponisme Reader

  2. Neojaponisme Meeting Modernity Exhibit | The R3dragon Blog Says:

    […] a reference is made to Portland, Or. or (shock) Vancouver, Wa. **My origins** Thus when reading this post in Neojaponisme I felt “compelled” to atleast check it out and comment if I felt […]